Reopening Plan

Last Updated: 9/3/2020 5:22 PM

In accordance with guidelines established by the New York State Department of Health (DOH), the Palmyra-Macedon Central School District has formulated a school reopening plan for submission to DOH, New York State Education Department (NYSED) and publication to the Pal-Mac community. The plan prioritizes in-person instruction as per NYS guidelines and offers two levels of programming: a full return to school (Level 1) or remote learning (Level 2).

 

To view the Reopening Plan in its entirety, click here.

 

To view Supplemental Reopening Plan Information Pursuant to the Interim Guidance for In-Person Instruction, click here.

 

Reopening Plan for Community-Based Agency

 

 

To ensure accessibility of the reopening plan in its entirety for all stakeholders, please find a version of the plan below in plain text.

 

Palmyra-Macedon Central School District

School Reopening Plan 

During the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency

July 31, 2020

 

Preface

 

Per the guidelines established by the New York State Department of Health (DOH), the district is expected to prioritize a return for all students to in-person instruction. This plan has been developed with understanding of the established guidelines and aligned to the New York State Learning Standards (TL.2).

 

This plan will be conspicuously posted on the public bulletin board in each building and on the school district’s website at: www.palmaccsd.org. The plan is accessible to those with visual and/or hearing impairments and in family’s spoken languages (C.5).

 

This district wide plan is in place for all school buildings in the district: Primary School, Intermediate School, Middle School, and High School. 

 

This plan is subject to change with limited notice based on State, regional, and local circumstances.

 

Should the regional metrics as determined by the Governor afford the opportunity for the district’s full re-opening of school, the district invites all parents to participate in Level 1 Programming beginning September 9, 2020.

 

The initial term for this plan shall be for the period September 9 - October 16, 2020.  

 

Each student’s primary contact will designate one of the following program options for the duration of the initial term.

 

  • Level 1 Programming: Full Return to School

  • Level 2 Programming: Remote Learning for Students in PK-12

  • Level 3 Programming: Homeschooling for Students (notice of intent)

 

Level 1 Programming: Full Return to School

 

It must be understood that a return to in-person instruction does not mean “business as usual.” Implementation of the State’s health, safety and instructional protocols will require the school setting to look, sound, and feel differently than the typical school setting. Plans, schedules, and instruction may change often depending on the existing circumstances. Patience is valued and needed.

 

School will reopen for all students whose parents prefer Level 1 Programming. Students will attend school per the approved school calendar on a daily basis and for the duration of the regularly-scheduled school day, participating in all scheduled classes as designated by the color-day/rotation cycle of the specific school building (H.1, S.1, TL.1).

 

Instruction is considered a core activity for purposes of the DOH guidelines.

 

Training (C.3, C.4, H.10, T.6, T.7, T.16, T.17)

All students and staff will be trained to follow COVID-19 protocols safely and correctly, 

including but not limited to hand hygiene, proper face covering wearing, social distancing, and respiratory hygiene, as well as any other attributes of this plan.  All staff members will receive an employee handbook specific to COVID-19 guidelines and symptom recognition (H.4).

 

Cohorts

The Department of Health encourages a cohort model and, as such, this model will be implemented in the Palmyra-Macedon Central School District for students in grades PK-8. Cohorts are self-contained, pre-assigned groups of students. To the extent possible, these groups will be established so as to prevent intermingling between cohorts. Due to the potential of changes in programmatic enrollment, classroom assignments previously conveyed in June 2020 may need to be changed. Students will be placed in cohorts to maximize health and safety. To the extent possible, students will remain in cohorts for all school-day instruction and activities including recess and lunch. Parents and students will be notified of finalized classroom assignments and course schedules as soon as practical.

 

For students in grades 6-12, lockers will not be available. 

 

Social Distancing (H.11)

Social distancing will be ensured and maintained between individuals in school facilities and on school grounds to the extent possible and unless safety or the core activity requires a shorter distance or individuals are of the same household. 

 

The sharing of food and beverages is prohibited unless individuals are members of the same household (CN.4). 

 

Community supplies and sharing of computer workstations is prohibited unless cleaning and disinfecting occurs between use.

 

Non-instructional congregation of people (e.g., dawdling, waiting, hanging out) with less than 6 feet of distance is prohibited.

 

Signage will be displayed to encourage adherence to guidance regarding the use of PPE. Staff members will encourage implementation (C.2).

 

Foot traffic in buildings will be designated by floor tape and signage to prevent intermingling, detail directional flow, and show medians where foot traffic is allowed only for hallway crossings. Stairways shall be designated for one-way traffic to the extent possible.

 

Large group assemblies where appropriate social distancing is not possible are impermissible.

 

Appropriate social distancing in school buildings and common areas means six feet of space in all directions between individuals or use of appropriate physical barriers between individuals. To the extent practicable, distance markers will be used to denote spaces of six feet. (Note Appendix C: State Education Department FAQ No. 11 
(Revised). 

 

Face Coverings (H.13)

All students, staff, and approved visitors must wear appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) to protect against the transmission of the COVID-19 virus (H.8). Acceptable face coverings include but are not limited to cloth-based face coverings (e.g., homemade sewn, quick cut, bandana), and surgical masks that cover both the mouth and nose.

 

Proper placement/wear of Face Coverings (Appendix A).

 

Parents are encouraged to offer assistance to children who may have difficulty in adapting to wearing a face mask. School staff are prepared to do the same.

 

Parents are encouraged to supply face coverings for their child’s use in the school setting. Employees are encouraged to supply a face covering for their use. The school will supply a face covering to any student who does not have one (T.14). PPE will be  available to all staff members (T.8).

 

If social distancing is not possible, individuals must wear acceptable face coverings.

 

Students and staff must be prepared to don a face covering if another person unexpectedly cannot social distance.

 

Face coverings must always be worn in common areas including entrances/exits, lobbies, and hallways.

 

School staff will don face coverings at all times; appropriate breaks and health practices will be applicable including during class instruction and meal times. Face coverings for school staff may be altered to ensure transparency/visualization as approved by a supervisor. 

 

Signage will be displayed to encourage adherence to guidance regarding the use of PPE (C.2). Staff members will encourage implementation.

 

By order of the Wayne County Director of Public Health dated November 21, 2020, students must wear acceptable face coverings at all times inside school buildings except for meals and limited breaks. ​As per the recommendation of the District’s Medical Director, school staff will afford limited face-covering breaks to students who desire them at appropriate times and throughout the school day. Each ​offered ​break will last for a​ ​minimum of five minutes and a maximum of eight minutes, ​and will occur as long as students are in their assigned cohorts/classes, and are separated from other people by either 6 feet or a physical barrier. Parents may direct their children to decline to take these breaks and notify the teacher (PK-5)/counselor (6-12) in advance of their wishes. Teachers will be instructed to use care not to single out any student who opts to leave a mask on during face-covering breaks. Staff members will provide face covering breaks throughout the day so that students have a minimum of one break every two hours with teachers consulting the building principal for younger learners or students needing additional support.​ ​In grades 6-12 the minimum standard is to offer one face covering break during each class. A staff member may not prevent students from taking face covering breaks. A staff member may not require students to take a face covering break; the breaks are optional for students. ​A distance of at least 6 feet will be maintained during these face covering breaks. Individuals must wear face coverings at all times on school buses. Contact tracers may take mask breaks into consideration when determining which students and staff may be subject to quarantine.

 

The following precautions may reduce risk of exposure and may help to limit the number of students and staff required to quarantine in some instances.

● Face covering breaks must be brief in duration (no more than 8 minutes).

● A staff member may not take a face covering break while students are in the same room.

● Remind students that the face covering break is optional, and that they may leave their face

coverings on if they choose.

● When possible, face covering breaks should be staggered or occur outside or in other areas with good airflow, and where maximum social distancing can be accomplished.

● Where desk barriers are available, students should take a face covering break only while separated by a desktop barrier

● When possible, and as weather permits, outdoor face covering breaks are preferred.

● It is preferable to offer face covering breaks in ways that maximize distance and separation among students. For example, rotate breaks by permitting only half the class to remove face coverings simultaneously. Designate classroom desks as either red or white in a checkerboard pattern for face covering breaks. All students at red desks take a break at the same time, while all students at white desks keep their face covering on. In that way, a student without a face covering is always 12’ away from other students without face coverings.

● When possible, offer face covering breaks when students are not required to actively engage in conversation.

 

NOTE WELL: For in-person instruction, students and staff are required to wear face coverings at all times. Separated from other people by either 6 feet or a physical barrier is when a student/staff member can be afforded breaks from face coverings. Staff members will afford such breaks in accordance with this plan.

 

Questions may be directed to the building principal.

 

Hygiene, Cleaning, and Disinfection (H.17)

The District will adhere to hygiene, cleaning, and disinfection requirements from the 

Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Department of Health (DOH). Logs will be kept by maintenance staff and maintained in the Office of Facilities and Operations. Logs will include the date, time, and scope of cleaning and disinfection. The Director of Facilities and Operations shall identify the frequency of disinfecting per the CDC/DOH guidelines and assign such responsibility to staff as designated by the District’s Disinfecting protocols These protocols include task, product, frequency, equipment needed, and precautions. Restrooms, cafeterias for meal services, and high-touch areas will be identified by the Director of Facilities and Operations and more frequent cleaning and disinfecting will be scheduled and conducted.

 

All students and staff will be trained on proper hand and respiratory hygiene (C.3). 

Hand hygiene stations will be maintained, including handwashing with soap, running water, and disposable paper towels, as well as an alcohol-based sanitizer containing 60% or more alcohol for areas where handwashing is not feasible.

 

Receptacles will be available throughout the building for the disposal of soiled items.

 

Students will be trained on the developmentally-appropriate disinfecting of personal 

equipment (e.g., desk, workstations, supplies) at intervals throughout the day as designated by school staff members.

 

While cleaning and disinfection are the primary responsibility of the school’s custodial 

staff, appropriate disinfecting supplies will be provided to staff including 

disposable wipes to clean commonly touched surfaces before/after use.

    

Drinking water will be available through bottle refilling stations only (F.10).

 

Safety Drills (H.18)

Social distancing will be enforced during all required safety drills.

 

Temporary directional signage shall be ignored during the event of an emergency and 

routine, posted emergency plans will be used. 

Education Law § 807 requires that schools conduct 8 evacuation and 4 lockdown drills each school year. Conducting drills is an important part of keeping students and staff safe in an emergency. When planning drills, modifications will be made to procedures in order to minimize risk of spreading infection. 

 

Regardless of the modification used when conducting a drill, all students and staff will be instructed that if it was an actual emergency that required evacuation or lockdown, the most imminent concern is to get to safety; maintaining social distancing in an actual emergency that requires evacuation or lockdown may not be possible and should not be the first priority. 

 

Modifications to evacuation drill protocols may include, but is not limited to conducting drills on a “staggered” schedule, where classrooms evacuate separately rather than all at once, and appropriate distance is kept between students to the evacuation site. Staggering by the classroom, minimizes contact of students in hallways, stairwells, and at the evacuation site. If conducting drills using a modified procedure, it is required that the drill be conducted with all students in the school building on that school day, it may be necessary to do so during a class period that is extended for this purpose

Modifications to Lockdown Drills may include, but are not limited to:

  • Conducting lockdown drill in classroom setting while maintaining social distancing and using masks;

  • Conducting lockdown drills on a “staggered” schedule with smaller numbers of students present to maintain social distancing, however schools must be certain that all students are receiving instruction in emergency procedures and participating in drills while they are in attendance in-person; and

  • Conduct lockdown drills in the classroom without “hiding”/ “sheltering” but provide an overview of how to shelter or hide in the classroom per the District’s adopted Emergency Plan.

 

Transportation for Students Enrolled in In-Person Instruction

Individuals must wear acceptable face coverings at all times on school buses (T.5, T.12). Drivers and monitors who must have direct physical contact with a child must wear gloves (T.10). Gloves will be provided (T.8).

    

Students must be wearing a face covering at the bus stop at the time of boarding the school bus. Students who do not have a face covering will not be denied transportation; they should wait until other students have boarded and will immediately be given a face covering by the bus driver (T.13). In order to ride the bus, all students must wear a face covering for the duration of the time aboard the bus (T.12). Students without authorized accommodations (T.15) who refuse to wear a face covering will not be able to board the bus and the child will remain in the custody of the parent.

 

Parents are encouraged to drop off or walk students to school to reduce density on 

buses. Parents are to communicate transportation requests/intentions through the parent survey distributed to all parents.

 

Students will be assigned a seat on a bus. Students will not be able to choose their own seat. Members of the same household and children who attend the same in-home childcare center will respectively share a seat on the school bus. Otherwise student riders will be socially distanced to sit one per seat to the extent possible. Bus ridership will be limited to approximately 50% or less of the rated capacity of the bus.

 

Outdoor ventilation will be increased to the extent possible while maintaining health and 

safety protocols.

 

Eating and drinking will be prohibited on the school bus (CN.4).

 

Bus drivers will disinfect the interior of the bus each time they return to the Transportation Facility, and at any other time between trips that the bus is empty and time permits (T.1, T.2).

 

School buses shall not be equipped with hand sanitizer due to its combustible composition (T.3). School staff will not carry personal bottles of hand sanitizer with them on school buses (T.4). Hand sanitizer will be provided at the Transportation Facility (T.9).

 

Child Nutrition

The district will continue to provide breakfast and lunch daily to students in the building in compliance with the Child Nutrition Program requirements (CN.1, CN.2, CN.6). Students will have access to hygiene stations prior to and after each meal service. Staff members and appropriate signage will notify students of hygiene procedures (CN.4). Serving lines will be modified to eliminate shared serving utensils. Touchpads will not be used by students. Food service staff will manage the distribution of meals. Food allergies will be accommodated by food service personnel (CN.3). 

 

Students do not need to wear face coverings when seated and eating but must practice social distancing (CN.8). 

 

The sharing of food and beverages is prohibited (CN.4).

 

To allow for required social distancing, students will eat meals in a combination of spaces (e.g., cafeteria, classrooms) as designated by the building principal.

 

Meal schedules will be modified to reduce density in eating areas.

 

Procedural training will be provided to students about the in-person meal service protocols including hand-hygiene prior to and after the meal service (C.4).

 

Common areas such as cafeterias will be disinfected between lunch periods (C.5). 

 

Student Arrival/Pickup for In-Person Instruction

Contact and entry of parent/legal guardians into a school building will not be allowed. Only a school administrator has the authority to allow an individual in any school building for an emergency purpose. 

 

Anyone not able to maintain a social distance once entering school grounds must be prepared to immediately use a face covering. Entry into the building requires a face covering to be worn.

 

Each school building has detailed arrival and dismissal procedures for students that includes locations for drop-off, buses, student drivers and walkers. The specific schedule will be communicated directly with families per enrollment. 

 

Once the official school day begins, the main office doors will serve as the only entrance for students into the building. 

 

Breakfast will be available for students to pick up and eat in their assigned classroom. 

 

Students will proceed directly to their first period class/classroom teacher.

 

Prior to dismissal, students will be reminded by public address of the requirements to wear a face covering while leaving the building and while riding the bus. 

 

Student dismissal will take place in a fashion to promote social distancing.

 

Staff members will be strategically placed and located throughout the buildings to help guide students to classrooms. 

 

Consistent Practices in Picking up your child at PMP and PMI 

In keeping with DOH requirements for health, adults picking up children for any reason will not be permitted to enter the school building. All adults picking up children must provide identification through the vehicle window to be verified by a staff member with the student management system. Upon verification, students will be escorted by a staff member to the waiting vehicle. It is vital that parent contact information, custody agreements, and emergency arrangements are up-to-date. A specific protocol for parking will be provided by each school.

 

Physical Education and Music Performance

When engaging in physical activity or vocal performance, students may remove their face covering but must maintain a social distance of 12 feet in these settings. For other circumstances in these classes, regular classroom requirements for face coverings and distance are applicable.

 

Athletics Extracurricular Activities (Grades 3-12)

Athletics are not authroized by the State of New York.

 

Extracurricular activities will be offered on a limited basis. Due to social distancing  requirements, transportation opportunities will be limited after the regular school day. All offered activities will adhere to the regular participation requirements and adherence to protocols in this plan will be required.

 

Mental Health, Behavioral and Emotional Support Systems (SE.1)

All school buildings are staffed with school counselors, school psychologists, and community agency social workers/counselors. Students having difficulty transitioning to in-person instruction will be supported by a professional in the counseling office or other trained staff member. Staff member training will be offered by the Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) team regarding talking with, and supporting students during and after the COVID-19 public health emergency. SEL teams (SE.2) with respective representatives are in place to employ existing practices for coping and resilience skills (SE.4). 

 

The Comprehensive Developmental School Counseling Program Plan was revised and approved by the Board of Education in July 2020. The plan meets the current needs of the district and provides resources and referrals to address mental health, behavioral, and emotional support services and programs (SE.3).

 

Communication (C.2, H.3) 
The following tool will be utilized to communicate about the content of this plan or other school and health-related matters: 

Website

The following tools may be utilized to communicate about the content of this plan or other school and health-related matters: 

• School Messenger;

• Parent Square; or

• Social Media; or

• Television loops in buildings; or

• Seesaw or Schoology; or

• Official newspaper.

Website communications will be offered in languages other than English as appropriate to Pal-Mac families and is accessible to those with visual and/or hearing impairments (C5, CN. 7, TL.5, SP.3). 

Student Absence from In-Person Instruction Due to Illness

When your child is absent from school for illness or any other reason, parents or  guardians must notify the School Health Office. Please remember to send in a written  note of explanation when your child returns to school.

 

Absence from in-person learning does not make a student eligible for Level 2 remote learning. Missed work can be requested from the clssroom teacher. For students in grades 6-12, call the counseling office prior to 10 a.m. to request missed work.

 

Health Screening (H.5, H.9)

Health screening is mandatory for all students, staff and essential visitors (H.8).

 

Parents are responsible for screening student health every day prior to a student boarding a school bus or entering a building. The screening must include a temperature check and assessment of illness-related symptoms. Parents allowing a child to board a school bus or enter the school building for the instructional program are verifying that a health screen has been completed and that the child has not:

 

  • Knowingly been in close or proximite contact in the past 14 days with anyone  who has tested positive through a diagnostic test for COVID-19 or who has or had symptoms of COVID-19;

  • Tested positive through a diagnostic test for COVID-19 in the past 14 days;

  • experienced any symptoms of COVID-19, including a temperature of greater than 100°F, in the past 14 days; and/or

  • travelled internationally or from a state with widespread community transmission of COVID-91 per New York State Travel Advisories.

 

In addition, on the evening prior to the first day of each school week, the district will send a reminder to parents they they must perform a daily health screening to determine whether their child has:

 

  • Knowingly been in close or proximite contact in the past 14 days with anyone  who has tested positive through a diagnostic test for COVID-19 or who has or    had symptoms of COVID-19;

  • Tested positive through a diagnostic test for COVID-19 in the past 14 days;

  • experienced any symptoms of COVID-19, including a temperature of greater than 100°F, in the past 14 days; and/or

  • travelled internationally or from a state with widespread community transmission of COVID-91 per New York State Travel Advisories.

 

Parents and school visitors will generally be prohibited from entering any school building during the public health emergency. 


 

Prior to starting a shift, employees must complete the district’s digital health screening. If an employee answers yes to any of the DOH-mandated questions they are directed to stay home and contact their immediate supervisor. The employee shall not be able to return to work until cleared by the Director of Instructional Support Services (T.11).

 

Taking Action on Health Screening Results

 

Any individual who screens positive for COVID-19 exposure or symptoms, or who presents with a temperature greater than 100°F, is not allowed to board a school bus or enter the school.

 

Students and staff who express exposure or present symptoms will be assessed by the school nurse and, as appropriate, be immediately sent home by the school nurse with instructions for the parent/guardian/staff member to contact the person’s healthcare provider for assessment and testing (H.6, Appendix B). 

 

Students being sent home because of a positive screen will be immediately separated from other students and supervised until picked up (H.7).

 

A student or staff member who develops COVID-19 symptoms during the school day will be sent to a dedicated area for separation to maintain social distancing until they are picked up from school/able to go home. 

 

Protocols for asthma-related acute respiratory treatment care include have been 

established in the School Medical Director’s Standing Protocols and will be implemented by all school nurses. 

 

For students who need to leave school for health-related concerns:

 

  • The school nurse or designee will contact the parent to immediately pick up the 

           child from the school building.

  • The student will remain contained.

  • The school nurse or designee will provide instructions to the parent/guardian to meet a staff member at the school’s main entrance for picking up the child from the contained area and signing the child out of school; instructions will be dependent on building, age of student, and circumstances.

  • Protocols for contacting the primary care physician or health department will be provided to the parent/student by the nurse or designee (Appendix B). 

 

Contact Tracing

The School Nurse Supervisor will work directly with the Directors of the Wayne 

and Ontario County Health Departments for contact tracing. The School Nurse Supervisor will trace the contact and provide such information to the respective health department, including the Traversa log from any school bus ridden by the reporting student. All information shall remain confidential.

 

For students who have come into close or proximate contact with a person with 

COVID-19, the student or a parent/guardian must report this information to the School Nurse of the building the child attends. 

 

Vulnerable Populations (H.12)

Students who are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness or have circumstances (e.g., documented medical/health risks, compromised immunity) to prevent safe participation in educational activities should, as soon as possible and prior to the start of the school year, submit such information to the attention of the building nurse of the school your child attends. Employees who are at increased risk for severe COVID-19 illness or have circumstances (e.g., documented medical/health risks, compromised immunity) to prevent safe participation in work should, as soon as possible and prior to the start of the school year, submit such information to the attention of the Director of Instructional Services. Submittal of the information will begin the process to determine appropriate accommodations to minimize COVID-19 exposure as related to the underlying health conditions and to the extent possible.

 

COVID Monitoring and Early Warning Signs

    

The Coordinator for COVID-19 health emergencies is the District’s School Nurse 

Supervisor, Deborah Matzan. The coordinator will work closely with the Public Health Departments of Wayne and Ontario Counties.

 

Conditions within a school may be perfectly fine but a spike in infections in the wider community might require shutdowns. The Director of Facilities and Operations will monitor Finger Lakes region metrics daily on the following State dashboards.

 

According to Governor Cuomo’s July 13, 2020 announcement

“Schools in a region can reopen if that region is in Phase IV of reopening and if its daily infection rate remains below 5 percent or lower using a 14-day average since unPAUSE was lifted. Schools will close if the regional infection rate rises above 9 percent, using a 7-day average, after August 1. New York State will make the formula determination during the week of August 1 to 7.”

 

The 7-Day Rolling Average of Percentage Positive Tests Per Day in the Finger Lakes Region will serve as the primary measure of whether the level of COVID-19 transmission may be increasing beyond an acceptable level.  The 7-Day Rolling Average of Percentage Positive Tests Per Day in the Finger Lakes Region will be monitored daily by the Director of Facilities and Operations in consultation with the School Nurse Supervisor and, superintendent, as appropriate. Early warning signs that positive COVID-19 cases may be increasing beyond an acceptable level, as established by state and local health departments, will be immediately discussed with the director of the local health department. The result of such discussions may include alterations to disinfecting protocols, closure of areas of the building, building closure or school district closure for certain cohorts of students, or full school closure with transition to remote learning. 

 

Testing Protocols and Responsibility

Testing referrals will be made by the School Building Nurse, under the direction of the 

School Nurse Supervisor. Consultation with the School Nurse Practitioner and Medical Director will occur as appropriate. Students/Families will be referred to the primary care physician and/or the testing sites offered in the community by the local health department and hospitals. 

 

Positive Test (H.15)

The Director of Facilities and Operations will enact the cleaning and disinfection 

of exposed areas in the event an individual is confirmed to have COVID-19, with such cleaning and disinfection to include, at a minimum, all heavy transit areas and high-touch surfaces as detailed in the CDC guidelines. Areas of buildings may be closed in consultation with the local health department.

The School Nurse Supervisor will immediately notify the state and local health department about the case of diagnostic test results that are positive for COVID-19.

 

Communicating about a Positive Test 
The Wayne County Public Health (WCPH) Department will not disclose personal information for those testing positive for COVID-19. Relevant parties will be notified appropriately by WCPH.  The School District, as per direction of WCPH, will use the school website to notify the community if a student tests positive. Parents and staff members will be notified by the school district's messenger alert system to check the website for an important update. Only the name of the school building impacted will be mentioned in the notification. 


The School District, as per direction of WCPH, will use the school website to notify the community if a staff member tests positive. Parents and staff members will be notified by the school district's messenger alert system to check the website for an important update. The name of the school building impacted will not be mentioned in the notification. 

 

Return-to-Learning (H.16)

Students who screen positive for COVID-19 symptoms can only return to the 

in-person learning environment when approved by school medical authorities and in accordance with the protocols of the local health department. Any return-to-learn will require signed documentation from a healthcare provider that includes an evaluation, negative COVID-19 testing, and symptom resolution/release from isolation.

 

School Closure

Should a complete school closure be warranted as determined by the local health department in consultation with the school superintendent and district’s medical director, the identified communication protocols will be used to provide information to families as aligned to the District’s existing safety and emergency plans. A transition to fully remote learning will require at least 3 days and no more than 5 days of planning time where remote instruction may not occur. Teachers will need to be afforded the opportunity to develop and alter lesson plans as well as ensure internet access and technology tools needed in their home environment are in place.

 

Compliance

The COVID-19 Safety Coordinator is the Director of Instructional Support Services (H.20), in consultation with the Superintendent or School Nurse Supervisor as appropriate. The Safety Coordinator is responsible for continuous compliance of the school district’s Reopening Plan, as well as any phased-in reopening activities necessary to allow for operational issues to be resolved before activities return to normal or “new normal” levels. 

 

No changes or additions to facilities are planned related to COVID-19 (F.1, F.5, F.7, F.8, F.12).

 

This plan is in compliance with the 2020 Building Condition Survey and Visual Inspection (F.2).

 

The district will conduct lead-in-water testing as required by all NYSDOH regulation 67-4 (F-3).

 

All existing and new alcohol-based hand-rub dispensers are in accordance with FCNYS 2020 Section 5705.5 (F-4).

 

All new building construction and temporary quarter projects will be submitted to OFP for a full code review (F.6).

 

The existing or altered number of toilet and sink fixtures meet the minimum standards of the BCNYS (F.9).

 

Plastic separators used in the district will comply with the 2020 BCNYS Section 2606 (F.13).

 

The Office of Facilities and Operations has adequate supplies and will monitor inventory at designated intervals to ensure an adequate supply of PPE (H.14).

 

Ventilation with fresh outside air shall be provided in all occupied spaces.  The Director of Facilities shall ensure that all occupied spaces will have an operable system to bring outside air into the space and that those systems are maintained to operate in accordance with the original design.  Ventilation filter product selection and replacement schedules shall be made in consultation with the district's mechanical engineers and in accordance with manufacturers' recommendations to balance air exchange rates and filtration levels.  The district will increase ventilation with outdoor air, by opening windows and doors, to the greatest extent possible while maintaining health and safety protocols.  (F.11). 

 

The district does not operate before/after care programs (H.19).

 

 

Level 2 Programming: Remote Learning for Students in PK-12

 

September 9 - October 16, 2020

 

Students whose parents prefer Level 2 Programming will engage in a Remote Learning experience. 

 

Note well that this model of remote learning is not the same as the emergency instruction that occurred in Spring 2020. There is not a pass/incomplete option.

 

Per Public Health Law, a child will not be able to participate in remote learning without an appropriate immunization certificate or acceptable evidence of immunization. To learn more about required immunizations, please visit the New York State Department of Health website at https://www.health.ny.gov/

prevention/immunization/laws_regs.htm.

 

A Remote Learning experience includes the following:

 

  • Each student attends school per the approved school calendar on a daily basis.

  • Each student follows the hours of an in-person school day according to a student's grade level and the assigned daily schedule. 

  • Each student must complete a digital citizenship course related to expectations and the code of conduct for remote learning.

  • Daily attendance and active engagement are required (AC.1).

  • Student participation and completion of all class and/or coursework are expected.

  • The District's attendance and grading policies will mirror that of in-person coursework.

  • There will be regular, substantive interactions between teachers and students that provide routine scheduled times for students to seek feedback and support from teachers (TL.3, TL.4):

    • Asynchronous (not live/in-person) assignments and assessments will be completed and submitted according to the regular school day schedule.

    • Students will be expected to be prepared and participate in live (synchronous) virtual lessons as outlined in their provided class schedule and as outlined in the digital citizenship course.

  • To protect individual privacy, live virtual lessons may not be recorded.

  • Primary School students will be provided i-Pads for remote learning.

  • Students in Grades 3-12 will be provided Chromebooks for remote learning.

  • Students must have viable internet access and the ability to document learning by scanning, video, audio or photograph when and if required.

  • Athletics are not authorized by the State of New York. 

  • Once school reopens and health metrics are assessed, the district will make a determination on extracurricular offerings. The district will work with the School District's Medical Director to identify appropriate health and safety guidelines for extracurricular activities should they be offered once school has reopened. If the District's Medical Director issues health and safety standards that apply to extracurricular activities, the District will, barring any economic or safety issues, implement those standards regardless of preference (remote or in-person).  

  • Substantial parental support and presence are necessary to:

    • assist children with varied activities and coursework.

    • monitor the daily student schedule.

    • ensure student attendance (i.e., prompt presence, logging in, participation, management), and report absences.

    • engage each student in self-guided asynchronous learning. 

    • coordinate with related service providers as appropriate.

    • provide and/or assist with home-school communication.

 

Remote learners at the Primary School will use Seesaw and Google Meet as platforms to deliver learning opportunities and document growth.

 

Remote learners in grades 3-12 will use Schoology, Schoology Conferences and Google Meet as platforms to deliver learning opportunities and document growth.

 

There is genuine concern about students who did not adequately engage in/attend to remote learning between March and June 2020. As such, remote learning is not the best option for such students/families. If a family’s preference for remote instruction is in question due to lack of fulfillment of the learning expectations, a school staff member will reach out directly to families for reassignment. The District reserves the right to decline parental preferences.

 

Student Absence from Remote Learning Due to Illness

 

When a child is absent from school for illness or any other reason, parents or guardians must notify the School Health Office. A written note of explanation must also be submitted.

 

Parents/students are to consult directly with the instructor regarding missed work for short-term absences.

 

Food Service for Remote Learners

The district will continue to make meals available in compliance with the Child Nutrition Program requirements and by request of students engaged in remote learning. Lunch and breakfast (for days on which school would normally have been in session) will be available. Parents may request food service for remote learners by completing the form available on the Food Services page at www.palmaccsd.org

 

In an effort to minimize personal contact, and increase social distancing, the district will serve multiple meals at a time.  During full 5-day school weeks, service will be provided as follows.

 

Mondays: 2 lunches and 2 breakfasts per student

Tuesdays: No meal service

Wednesdays: 3 lunches and 3 breakfasts per student

Thursdays: No meal service

Fridays: No meal service

 

Meal service schedules for shortened school weeks will be available on the Food Services page at www.palmaccsd.org

 

Meal pickup will occur outside of the Pal-Mac High School main entrance (151 Hyde Parkway, Palmyra) after the regular school day.  Parents will pull up along the curb near the main entrance flagpoles and remain in their vehicle. A staff person will bring the meals to the vehicle.

 

Any family who needs help with the request form or is unable to pick up meals at the High School, should call 315-597-3407 for assistance.

 

Internet and Device Access

In March 2020, the District assessed students’ levels of access to devices and high-speed internet and addressed accordingly. The District provides a device to every enrolled student (TC.1, TC.2, TC.3).


 

Level 3 Programming: Homeschooling for Students

 

Homeschooling (home instruction) is governed by the regulations of the New York State Education Department. Parents wishing to homeschool a child must follow the published guidelines, including the submittal of an intent to homeschool and an Individualized Home Instruction Plan (IHIP). 

The Stated Education Department has published a Q&A document to support parents in the homeschooling process at:

 

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/sss/homeinstruction/homeschoolingqanda.html

 

Parents must submit a letter of intent to homeschool according to the established timeframe. Letters of intent are to be emailed to: Dawn Nichols, District Registrar at: dawn.nichols@palmaccsd.org or by mail: 151 Hyde Parkway, Palmyra, NY 14522. Once the original letter of intent has been submitted the Wayne-Finger Lakes BOCES administers the homeschooling process on behalf of the school district. A BOCES official will contact any family who submits a letter of intent.

 

 

Students with Disabilities

The district will provide a free appropriate public education consistent with the need to protect the health and safety of students with disabilities and those providing special education and services. Programs and services are documented in Individualized Education Programs or Section 504 plans. A parent handbook is provided and parents and students are contacted by a case manager. All parents and students are invited to participate in CPSE/CSE meetings (SP.1, SP.2, SP.3, SP.4).

 

Students with a disability which would prevent them from wearing a mask will not be forced to do so or denied transportation (T.15).

 

The District will ensure access to the necessary accommodations, modifications, supplementary aids and services, and assistive technology to meet the unique disability-related needs of students (SP.5).


 

Attendance at a Special School designated by the Committee on Special Education (CPSE/CSE),Community-Based UPK, or Nonpublic School

 

Parents must refer to the specific section on Level 1 Transportation (T.18).

 

Instructional protocols will be established by the special/nonpublic school.

 

The community-based UPK center will submit a Continuity of Learning Plan that addresses in-person and remote models of instruction and will follow health and safety guidelines outlined in NYSED guidance and required by the New York State Department of Health (TL.6).

 

 

Bilingual Education 

The ELL identification process shall be completed within 30 days of the start of the school year for all students who enrolled during the COVID-19 school closure in 2019-20 as well as all students who enrolled in summer 2020 and during the first 20 days of the 2020-21 school year. The ENL teacher in conjunction with the district registrar will facilitate the ELL identification process. After this 20-day flexibility period, identification of ELLs must resume for all students within required ten school days of initial enrollment as required by Commissioner’s Regulations Part 154. Instructional units of study will be provided to all ELLs based on their most recently measured English language proficiency level during in-person and remote instruction. The ENL teacher will continue to contact families and maintain a log of all communication (B.1, B.2, B.3). 



 

Requesting Changes to Selected Level of Programming

With appropriate regard to State Education Department regulations, it is also important to understand that any requests for changes or new placements will take patience and time. New entrants, requests to change a student’s level of programming, and transportation alterations will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis. Given the implemented health protocols and modified school and bus schedules, significant time will be needed for school staff to accommodate requested changes. The preferences in place at the start of the school year will likely remain in effect through October 16, 2020 (unless orders are modified by the Governor or the local Department of Health).


 

 

Public Use of School Facilities During Public Health Emergency

The public is invited to submit an application for use of the school facilities in accordance with District Policy 1500. Please be advised that all applications will only be considered with an accompanying health and safety plan reviewed by the local health department. All elements of this plan must be enforced by any organization authorized by the district to use the facilities. Failure to comply may result in the revocation of authorization to use the district’s facilities.


 

Miscellaneous

The District will continue with its currently approved APPR Plan (TP.1).

 

To the extent possible, the District will meet the requirements for teacher certification, incidental teaching, and substitute teaching (CIS.1). 

 

NOTE: This plan is subject to change. It is important to keep in mind that DoH protocols may require the closure of a building or change in some standards that warrant reduction of school enrollment in a building. Altered models may present substantial challenges for families (i.e., childcare, employment) and will only be employed if health department guidelines warrant the measure.

 

 

Stakeholder Participation

The District engaged with school stakeholders and community members including administrators, faculty, staff, families, collective bargaining units, and community-based groups. (C.1, H.2)

 

The Director of Wayne County Public Health has been consulted regarding this plan (H.1).

 

In addition, all parents, community members, and staff were invited to participate in a ThoughtExchange to provide feedback on the health, safety, and instructional program for 2020-21. In July 2020, all parents were invited to participate in a reopening survey (88.5% Response Rate).

 

 

APPENDIX A

 

How To Wear Cloth Face Coverings

 

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/how-to-wear-cloth-face-coverings.html

 

APPENDIX B

 

SAMPLE LETTER REQUIRED BY DOH TO BE GIVEN TO ILL STAFF OR PARENTS OF STUDENTS WHO PRESENT WITH SIGNS OR SYMPTOMS OF COVID-19

 

Per the symptoms you are experiencing based on the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) symptoms list for COVID-19, you may have an infection.

 

For the safety of the school community and with guidance from the local public health department and our district physician, the district is unable to allow anyone with these symptoms into our building at this time. We recommend that you contact your physician or other healthcare provider, share the symptoms you have described to us, and determine whether you should have COVID-19 viral testing or other medical care.

 

Meanwhile, we advise that you remain home and follow CDC guidelines for what to do

when you are sick to keep yourself and others safe. These guidelines can be found at

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/steps-when-sick.html.

 

Most people who have COVID-19 have mild illness and are able to recover at home. If,

however, any of the following severe symptoms develop, call 911 for immediate

assistance:

 

  • Trouble breathing

  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest

  • New confusion

  • Inability to wake or stay awake

  • Bluish lips or face

 

While you are sick, please stay home, get plenty of rest, stay hydrated, stay in touch

with your doctor, and please try to avoid being around other people to stop the spread

of infection.

 


August 26, 2020 
FAQ No.11 (Revised) 
Where do we take measurements from to establish social distancing; for example in the layout of furniture/equipment/etc.? 
To achieve acceptable social distancing between the occupants of classroom desks, chairs and teaching consoles, establish a minimum of 6' separation measured to the centerline of individual's space. Measurements should be taken in a manner consistent with the example diagrams below. 

spacing image

 

Appendix D - Guide to Social Emotional Learning 

Introduction

Creating Classroom / School Community Vision - All staff members will establish a daily ritual of connection for greeting students Vision - All staff members involve students in the creation of rules. agreements. and/or norms for their classrQom or setting Vision - All staff members will utilize interactive modeling (teaching procedures / routines)

Social Awareness & Communication Vision - all staff members will have information on how to respond and discuss COVID-19 in a developmentally appropriate way Vision - All staff members will have information on how to respond and discuss issues related to social justice and racial inequality with students in a developmentally appropriate way

Self Care Resources

 

Introduction

Dear Colleagues,

Through teacher leader work this summer, Social Emotional Learning and emotional support was identified as a main priority for the district. Following our meeting at the beginning of July, a comprehensive Student Learning Plan (SLP) was created across disciplines. Many leaders included elements of social emotional learning within their individual plans. In addition, a district wide, Tier One initiative for purposeful and intentional Social Emotional Learning was formed. District Leaders from Responsive Classroom, Mindfulness, Trauma Informed Schools, Counseling, and Psychology came together in order to create a UPK-12 vision for SEL. The visions and strategies listed in this document are not new, complex or difficult to implement. These are rooted in building relationships, connection and belonging, establishing a community and sound teaching practices. As high leverage strategies they will ultimately support student social, emotional, and academic success. Research in these areas tells us that investing in the time to truly make these strategies work upfront WILL payoff in the long run. Returns on this investment include: better student-teacher relationships, more student engagement in learning, and ultimately better student outcomes.

For staff members who need permission to focus on building relationships even if that time comes at the expense of content. Permission is granted.

For staff members who need to be told that this a priority and that they need to focus on this daily. You have been told that this is our top priority, spend time on it daily.

For staff members who need to be pleaded with, we are in fact begging you to spend time on this each day, each class period, each online hangout.

Our district has invested time and energy into several SEL topics over the past few years. These topics are directly related to the information included in this guidebook. In an attempt to bring all these together and to help us make sense of our purpose, the following information is provided to answer this question:

How are each of these topics related to purposeful and intentional SEL?

Check and Connect/SEARCH Institute

Check and Connect is an intensive intervention at the secondary level that provides intentional mentoring of high risk students by staff members. This intervention consists of two components: Connecting with the student through a specific type of relationship building called

'developmental relationships', as well as checking academic progress and engagement on a regular basis. A guide to building relationships from the SEARCH Institute can be found here. A developmental relationship has two main characteristics. Adults are able to both care for, and challenge, a student. Developmental relationships are those within which a student can ask questions, learn, and grow. Often, students form these relationships within the family system. However, there are times and circumstances where school staff fulfill this role. Through our knowledge of child and adolescent development, we know that students who feel accepted and cared for will then accept being challenged better when they are relatively certain the person challenging them cares. For some students, this can take an extended period of time (upwards of 2 years). Here is a resource on how to build these relationships given our current circumstances. Executive Functioning

According to Harvard University, executive functioning skills are "the mental processes that allow us to plan, focus attention, remember instructions and juggle multiple tasks successfully". When students are explicitly taught executive functioning skills, they are able to make decisions and complete tasks to the best of their ability. The assumption is that all children have positive intentions, and want to be successful. Through this lens, we notice when children are having a challenging time, and we figure out what skill needs to be taught to help them be successful. When students' executive functioning is working smoothly, and we have expectations that are developmentally appropriate, they are better able to follow through with learning skills and completing tasks. If they are missing an executive functioning skill, they are more likely to experience failure and frustration within a given assignment/task/set of direction. With an onset of frustration, the child is more likely to begin functioning with the protective part of their brain (freeze, flight, fight), and therefore will be unable to think clearly, actively participate, store/retrieve information, or complete their work.

In other words, teaching executive functioning skills, help students feel more positive, connected and successful and this will help them access the thinking part of their brain. Accessing the thinking part of the brain will allow students to store and retrieve higher level information and skills. Social Emotional Learning is dependent on executive functioning. If we teach children what their space looks like when they are ready to learn, we are helping them feel safe and ready for learning, and we are able to begin teaching sooner. If we teach a student the steps to solving a problem, we are also teaching them to notice when there is a social problem, give space to think, and then go through steps of solving a problem. Additional information is available from the 10/2018 PD in our district from .

 

Situation

Executive Functioning

SEL

 

Beginning class on time/preparing to learn

teacher shows a picture of how a learning space looks when ready to learn (ie: folder, pencil, notecards on desk). The picture helps the child have visual to see the expectation and check to see if hat they do matches. The picture cue also helps is skill become ingrained in the memory and more automatic with each class period.

e child is ready to learn with the necessary materials to successfully begin when the teacher starts the class.

ey are better able to attend, are more alm in their mind and body and therefore better able to focus and use the inkin art of their brain.

 

Time management

001: 360 Thinking Time Tracker App:

executive functioning clock is put on the smartboard. It colors in the portions of the class to se as time markers for students and as a result, eaches time management, checking in with goals, d assessing productivity within time frames of the lass.

en children learn how to manage eir time, they are more likely to stay n task, successfully accomplish goals, set higher goals for the future, feel connected to the class/teacher, and feel less stressed. It also reduces conflict between the teacher and the student.

Consistent class schedules

e teacher has a visual of the class schedule that is consistent. The visual can be a list or a picture hart. For example: A high school course may have greeting, emotions check in, connection, lesson, ork time, closure.

When students work within a consistent routine, they feel more at ease, know hat is expected, are ready for learning, d able to access the thinking part of eir brain.

 

             

IB/PYP/MYP Approaches To Learning (ATLs)

ATLs are the core of what makes 1B an effective structure to foster life-long skills. The ATLs serve as the bedrock for our work as we move forward with our vision of READY". ATLS focus the work of schools and teachers across the district, uniting them in a common purpose - helping our students learn "how to learn"

5 skills (thinking, communication, social, self-management, and research) that are relevant to all subject areas and life outside school.

ATLs help students become self-regulated learners

ATLs are skills that students need to be successful inside and outside of school Mindfulness

Beginning in 2017 all students in grades PK - 2 began receiving regular instruction in the practice of mindfulness. Students are taught strategies for emotional regulation that include breathing techniques, focus activities, connection activities, body/mind awareness, specific lessons on emotions, mindful communication, building empathy/kindness, and relaxation techniques. (

Mindfulness helps students connect to their experiences and be mindful of their inner world (thoughts, emotions, reactions). It teaches how to build lasting relationships and become more empathetic and compassionate. Research in education shows that students who learn and practice mindfulness skills/strategies with a trained instructor, have improved attention, more impulse control, and emotional stability. These students also develop the capacity to notice when they are off track, and are better able to shift to the present moment. Mindfulness also helps students become aware of their emotions, thoughts and the physical sensations related to those emotions. When we are aware of our emotions and how they feel in the body, we are more likely to notice when we are having strong emotions, and therefore more likely to use a tool and inner resources to regulate our emotions, become more balanced and build resiliency. Emotional regulation impacts stress levels, relationships and our ability to stay focused on a task, and use the thinking part of the brain to make healthy choices/resolve conflicts as well as process, store and retrieve information. Mindfulness teaches people the skill of leaving a space between stimulus and response in challenging situations. This space allows students to reflect on their emotions, take a calming breath and make a more healthy decision in their response. Building the quality of mindfulness in students helps students have tools they can use throughout their entire life.

The following is an excerpt from the article, How SEL and Mindfulness Can Work Together by Linda Lanteiri and Vicki Zakrzewski httnq•//greate.rgood herkeley emotional learning and mindfulness can work together

Integrating SEL and mindfulness

When SEL and mindfulness are integrated, the five SEL competencies laid out by CASEL have more fertile ground in which to grow and ultimately be embodied by students and adults alike. For example:

Competency 1: Self-awareness Students ' self-awareness deepens when enhanced by the mindfulness practices of focusing attention and self-compassion.

Competency 2: Self-management Mindfulness increases students ' emotion regulation skills, which enhances their ability to resolve conflict more creatively or to say how they 're feeling in an emotionally balanced way.

Competency 3: Social awareness Mindfulness increases students ' empathy by helping them to regulate their emotions rather than get emotionally overwhelmed when faced with a difficult situation. As a result, their capacity to notice another person 's suffering and respond to it increases.

Competency 4: Relationship skills Mindfulness increases compassion. Thus, when students practice SEL skills such as creating a win-win solution with someone who challenges them, they are doing so with more compassionate understanding.

Competency 5: Decision-making Mindfulness increases cognitive flexibility and creativity, which gives students a wider range of responses to challenging situations.

Responsive Classroom

Responsive Classroom is a research based, student-centered, social and emotional learning approach to teaching both academics and self-regulation/ discipline. This approach creates the conditions for students to be successful by designing a classroom community that is safe, joyful, and engaging.

Responsive Classroom is currently the Tier I approach in our district for students in grades Pk-5. Although Responsive Classroom is an approach to building classroom community geared towards k-8 settings, there is nothing included in the framework that cannot be implemented at the higher grade levels. Here is a document, adapted from Responsive Classroom, that can be used during class times to support students.

Restorative Practices and Community Circles

     Restorative justice empowers students to resolve conflicts on their own or in small groups with the support of a facilitator. Restorative justice is a growing practice at schools around the country. Students come together in small groups to talk, ask questions, and discuss differences of opinions. RJ is viewed as an alternative, or an addition, to traditional punishment/suspension historically used in schools. As we grow our practices at Palmyra Macedon Middle School, we are working to empower students to be active participants in resolving conflict.

 Community Circles are a great tool to use to build the classroom community through purposeful and intentional questioning that the teacher facilitates and each child responds to going around in a circle. This guarantees that each child is seen, heard and understood. This is also a great way to build relationships and routine.

Self-Care:

 Self-care is vital for building resilience towards stressors in life that you can't eliminate. When you've taken steps to care for your mind and body, you 'Il be better equipped to live your best life.

Unfortunately, however, many people view self-care as a luxury, rather than a priority. Consequently, they're left feeling overwhelmed, tired, and ill-equipped to handle life's challenges. It is important to assess how you're caring for yourself so you can ensure you are caring for your mind, body, and spirit. A good analogy to think about is that of the plane flight attendants safety demonstration before take off. In the event that the oxygen masks drop they tell you to put on your own oxygen mask first before helping others. This is the same with self-care. We need to care well for ourselves before we can truly care for others. Self-care is a priority and necessity, not a luxury, in the work that we do.

Trauma Informed Care (TIC)

     In October of 2017, Kaitlin McWilliams presented to the district on ACES and Trauma Informed Practices we can incorporate into classroom practice. We discussed and investigated multiple ways that trauma can impact learning and the brain. Being trauma informed means that we incorporate strategies into our setting that attempt to reduce the fight, flight, freeze response that is common with those who have experienced trauma. This response is common to all humans, however those who have experienced trauma are much more easily triggered. When in this mode, new learning is significantly reduced or completely inhibited. Students are tending to think more with the 'downstairs brain' rather than the 'upstairs brain' (reference to executive functioning and Sarah Ward), where higher level thinking can occur. A main takeaway from this is that we can put universal, trauma informed strategies into practice that will help ALL students feel safe and ready to learn, whether we are aware of their trauma or not.

Trauma, Illness and Grief (TIG)

     Beginning in 2016, our psychologists, counselors, and administrators began training in the TIG model of support. This training includes information on a variety of crisis situations that may occur within a school setting, expected consequences, and ways to respond. Based on this training and information, our District Crisis Plan underwent a major revision in May 2019. In the summer of 2020, TIG and Crisis Teams from each building met, reviewed information related to COVID-19, school closure, expected recovery trajectories, and how to identify high risk behaviors. This information was used to create support structures for each building for high risk individuals, as well as how to support classrooms in implementing SEL for students.

The ASCD Whole Child Approach

 In 2019 Palmyra-Macedon CSI) adopted ASCD's Whole Child as a framework to help guide among other areas social emotional learning. The vision being that in order to be "Ready" Red Raiders need to be healthy, safe, engaged, supported and challenged. The following excerpt is from ASCD's website. The demands of the 21st century require a new approach to education, one that fully prepares students for college, career, and citizenship. Research, practice, and common sense confirm that a whole child approach to education will develop and prepare students for the challenges and opportunities of today and tomorrow by addressing students' comprehensive needs through the shared responsibility of students, families, schools, and communities.

All educators want to improve the work they do for students, their families, and the community. Whether it's instruction, school climate, leadership, family engagement, or any of the other issues schools face on a daily basis, all educators need tools to help them improve their actions and methods. A whole child approach, which ensures that each student is healthy, safe, engaged, supported, and challenged, sets the standard for comprehensive, sustainable school improvement and provides for long-term student success.

ASCD's Whole Child approach is an effort to transition from a focus on narrowly defined academic achievement to one that promotes the long-term development and success of all children. Through this approach, ASCID supports educators, families, community members, and policymakers as they move from a vision about educating the whole child to sustainable, collaborative actions.

Creating Classroom / School Community

Vision - All staff members will establish a daily ritual of connection for greeting students

Rationale: Establishing a daily ritual of connection for greeting students will help students feel safe, a part of the classroom and valued, resulting in being more on task and ready to learn. Additionally, given this unprecedented time, it will be more important than ever before to establish connections with students and all members of the school community. Research has shown that when students feel connected to the adults at school, they develop better resiliency skills, are more likely to ask for help, and improve recovery outcomes from trauma.

Goals:

  1. To set a positive tone for the day or class period
  2. To provide a sense of recognition and belonging
  3. To help students and teachers learn and use everyone's name (with the added challenge of recalling names due to face coverings)
  4. To let students practice hospitality and friendliness

adapted from Responsive Classroom Goals for Greetings

Daily Greeting and Ritual Ideas

These should be used with each student whether they are arriving into a classroom space, the teacher is entering the space, or students are joining a virtual session.

Make eye contact and greet each student by preferred name daily

Be mindful about using a friendly voice and friendly body language

 

Greeting/Ritual Ideas for all ages (birth -110)

Say Hello, Hi, Good morning / afternoon

Use preferred name/pronouns (unsure? Ask- "What name and pronouns would you like me to use?" )

Use a check in system for feelings/state of mind o Students may not want to share and that is ok o If a student shares that they are feeling badly, that is ok, too. The purpose is to check in and refer to others if needed. o   Arrival music

 

PK-5 Greeting/Ritual ideas

6-12 Greeting/ Ritual Ideas

 

In person

Virtual adaptations

In person

Virtual adaptations

 

Use a visual hallway poster- stand at the door when students are

Students can write a word or use an emoji to share how they would like to be

Rate yourself 1-5

(verbal or show of hand)

Using emojis to rate how you are feeling

entering the classroom allow them to choose how they would like to be greeted

greeted as they enter the virtual session

 

 

 

Point to how you feel many choices fewer choices

Share your screen to display photo and invite students to think about how they feel (invite to share in chat or email message IF they want to share)

Notice how you feel.

Look at chart of facial expressions or emotion words and identify how feel silently.

Share one word to describe how you are feeling today

 

Personal connection during attendance

(how are you? What is your favorite)

Same procedure for virtual: go through the list of names

Personal connection during attendance (how are you? What is your favorite—)

 

 

Energy level (hand high, mid or low)

 

Energy level (hand high, mid or low)

 

 

Daily question for kids to answer (eg. What are you excited about?

Worried about? Etc.)

Via comments in chat box

Daily question for kids to answer (eg. What are you excited about?

Worried about? Etc.)

via comments in chat box

 

"That's me" questioning

Turn camera off teacher shares a statement, if that applies to student they turn on camera and wave

"That's me" questioning

Turn camera off teacher shares a statement, if that applies to student they turn on camera and wave

 

                 

For more greeting ideas

Online Activity Resources

Vision - All staff members involve students in the creation of rules, agreements, and/or norms for their classroom or setting

Rationale: Goal setting and rule creation work closely together. When students set goals, they can envision the role that the classroom environment/climate plays in order for all members of the community to be successful. When the entire class community is involved in the creation of rules, students are more invested due to shared ownership. Rules stated using positive phrasing (the dos rather than the don'ts), will allow students to envision themselves following through with how to be in the classroom.

Suggested plan for creating classroom agreements:

l. What is a goal you have for this class/year? Why do we come to school? What are our values?

What are your rights when you come to school? What are your responsibilities at school?

  1. Use the conversation from step one to have students brainstorm a list of rules or agreements to follow based on goals, rights, responsibilities or values - make sure these rules are framed in the positive ("no name calling" could be framed as ''be respectful")
  2. Once your "long" brainstorm list is compiled, it is best to group similar rules into categories in order to narrow the list down to 3-4 more "broad" agreements. These could relate to 1B traits.
  3. Post the list of agreements in your classroom or virtual classroom and discuss what each looks like/sounds like. Also including what does it look like and sound like in special area classes or other spaces in the school.
  4. Reflect on the process - who created these agreements? Where did they come from? Why is it important that we all agree?
  5. Revisit agreements: After breaks, whenever a 'reboot' is needed, as a reflection on growth. Refer to the agreements as problems arise with an individual(s) who need to problem solve and calmly redirect.

Vision - All staff members will utilize interactive modeling (teaching procedures / routines)

From the Responsive Classroom article "What is Interactive Modeling?"

Rationale: This is the MOST important learning structure in Responsive Classroom. It is used to teach a skill that needs to be done in one specific way. Interactive Modeling can be used for teaching procedures and routines (getting students attention, walking in the hall, procedures for entering a classroom, bathroom procedures) as well as academic skills (working with a partner).

Students Learn exactly why the skill is important to their learning

Are asked what they notice about the teacher's model

See a few classmates model

Practice routine right away

Receive immediate feedback and coaching as they practice

This can be used to reteach skills if students are having difficulty

This is an investment in time up front but pays off in time saved over the course of the school year

At the start of a new school year or experience, it cannot be assumed that students (of any age) know the exact procedures/routines - this must be modeled

"Clear is Kind": when we use interactive modeling to help students know and practice routines, we are giving them the opportunity to build executive functioning skills, be successful and ease anxiety.

Interactive modeling should be utilized at all levels for new procedures such as cleaning student work spaces, storing belongings, wearing a face covering and how /when breaks should occur, transitions.

Modeling may include narration; however, consider whether the purpose is to have students create their own schema of the task, or if they may need explicit instruction in the problem solving/thinking process.

The seven steps of interactive modeling:

l. Say what you will model and why.

  1. Model the behavior (the exact way you want them to do it)
  2. Ask students what they noticed.
  3. Invite one or more students to model.
  4. Again, ask what they noticed.
  5. Have all students practice.
  6. Provide feedback

Interactive Model Example: A Signal for Getting Students' Attention

*Options of a signal might include: ringing a chime/bell, clapping, raising hand, turn off lights, etc.

Steps

at it might sound / look like

1. Say what you will model and why

today I'm going to teach you a signal for when I need to get your attention. This is important because there will be thnes we need to stop hat we are doing for directions or to move to another activity. This will help us reach one of our "I Can" statements for today: "I can follow responsibilities and routines in our classroom."

Teacher models the behavior

atch as I have ring this chime. (co teacher or give to a student ith a purell wipe) Notice what I do. Model finishing sentence, stopping d putting your eyes on the person ringing the chime, having a calm body, ming off your voice, desk closed. (don't narrate as you do this)

Ask students what they noticed.

at did you notice I did when I heard the chime?

Invite one or more students to model

et's watch and  As I ring the chime notice what hey do.

Again, ask students what they noticed.

at did you notice and did when I rang the chime? ow does responding to the chime help us follow responsibilities and outines in our classroom?

6. Have all students practice

ow let's all practice.

Provide Feedback

ive class feedback. I noticed that we were all able to stop, calm your dies,turn off voices and look at the speaker when I chimed. This is an example of following routines and responsibilities. We will continue to practice this throughout the next few days. Connect feedback to I can statements.

Interactive Model Planning Guide

Secondary Art: Paint Brush Example

Steps

What it might sound / look like

l. Say what you will model and why

Today I will be modeling how to properly clean paint brushes at the end of class. Paint brushes are expensive and can easily be destroyed with 1 use. In order to make sure you always have a good paint brush and to make sure other art students have paint brushes that work, we will take the time to clean them in this way.

2. Teacher models the behavior

(model without talking) I get up with my paint brush. Take it to the sink. Turn the water on SLOWLY. Put palm under running water. Bring paint brush to hand and swirl in water in a circular motion. Stop when water is clear. Place the brush in the coffee cup with handle side down.

3. Ask students what they noticed.

What did you notice I did to take care of the brush? Students share and include specifics of the steps.

4. Invite one or more students to model

Let's watch and

As they wash their brush and

 

 

notice what they do.

5. Again, ask students what they noticed.

What did you noticeand did when they washed the brushes? How does cleaning the brushes help us follow through with our classroom agreements?

6. Have all students practice

Let's all practice

7. Provide Feedback

ive class feedback. I noticed that we were all able to stop, calm your odies,turn off voices and look at the speaker when I chimed. This is an example of following routines and responsibilities. We will continue to practice this throughout the next few days. Connect feedback to I can statements.

 

 

Social Awareness & Communication

Vision - all staff members will have information on how to respond and discuss COVID-19 in a developmentally appropriate way

Rationale: "Language is one of the most powerful tools available to teachers. It permeates every aspect of teaching and learning. We cannot give a lesson, welcome a child into the room or handle a classroom conflict without using words. Children cannot do a science observation or reading assignment or learn a classroom routine without listening to and interpreting their teacher 's words. And what they hear and interpret - the message they get from their teacher-has a huge impact on how they think and act, and ultimately how they learn. " (The Power of Our Words)

Documents with suggested language and consistent terms along with best practices for reflective listening:

From ccsl & TIG From SAMHSA From NASP From Search Institute

Stick to the facts: "Our procedures and guidelines are from the CDC, New York State and the County Department of Health" "Following these agreements keep us healthy and safe:"

Avoid sharing personal beliefs and opinions both political or otherwise

Provide time and space for questions and expressions of feelings

Utilize the terms: face covering, Covid 19 (also referred to as the CoronaVirus)

Avoid slang terms such as "rona", "virus" "China virus", etc

Empower students to advocate for their health and safety needs.

 

Health and Safety Non-negotiables

Students May Say

How to Respond

Face Coverings

"My parents say I don't have to wear a mask"

"This is all a hoax anyways"

"It's not any worse than the flu"

"It's so uncomfortable/hot/gross"

"Wearing face coverings is the way that we can all be together in school."

"These are the steps you take to protect yourself, your classmates, your family - parents, siblings, grandparents, and your community."

"I know it is difficult to keep the face covering on all day, but this is what we need to do to be together to learn and have frn."

"We show we are caring by wearing the face coverings."

*Secondary level "These are the guidelines required by the

Department of Health."

Physical

Distancing

"This is my friend and we hang out together all the time and are near each other."

"I want to talk to him / her privately" and/or Student slides desk next to another student

"My parent said I can go near him/her" .

"I wish I could hug you/ them." (elementary most likely)

"I don't want to be this close to someone"

"He/she is too close"

"After school you will probably be together without that much space, however in school we need to follow that guideline so we can all be together safely.

"I understand you want to be able to talk to your friend privately.

Right now we need to maintain a safe social distance of 6 feet."

"Air hugs are a great way to show you care"

"For short periods of times, we may need to come a bit closer to each other, but face coverings will help us stay safe."

"It is so important to let us know when we are uncomfortable.

Remember to use an 'I feel' and 'I need' statement to express what you need to feel safe."

Example: "I feel nervous when people are too close to me. I need you to move away."

"If we can back up a couple of steps, we can all stay safe."

Care of space and materials

"I don't need to wipe/clean my space. It's not my job"

"It's everyone's responsibility to take care of our community."

"I'm a helper by wiping down my space/ chromebook/ ipad/ materials, etc."

Advocating for personal health and safety

"He/she is too close!"

(student is visibly uncomfortable)

'I am worried about getting sick"

"It is important to understand what makes us uncomfortable, and o advocate for ourselves. A great way to do that is to let someone know how you feel and what you need."

Responding to questions and concerns using Reflective Listening

Most students who express a concern or uncomfortable feelings about Covid 19 (also referred to as the coronavirus) will be able to resume daily activities following a quick conversation and without distress. In order to ensure this occurs, it is important for the adults at school and home to respond in a manner that is calm, empathic, and reassuring. It is important to reflect the child's thoughts and feelings with empathic statements that convey that the student is being heard. It is not recommended that reassurance be provided in a manner that is dismissive of students feelings with statements such as ''you shouldn't feel that way." Rather, reassurance that communicates that "all of the adults are working together to keep everyone safe and healthy" and gives a level of empowerment that "we can all be helpers to stay healthy by washing our hands, etc.." might be more beneficial.

Reflective Listening Steps

Be calm, present and give eye contact so the child knows you are actively listening.

Children appreciate adults being physically at their level, therefore sitting on the floor together or getting down on knees can reassure them that they are being seen and heard. o For older children, use relaxed, open body language and sit next to student if possible Let children know that talking about their thoughts, emotions and concerns is healthy and you are here to listen.

Listen without interrupting, and then reflect back what you heard.

"I hear you saying that....". This helps the child know s/he is being listened to, helps any inaccuracies, and builds empathy. Point out the implicit thoughts and feelings.

"It sounds like and/or "That may have felt o This will help you and the child have a better understanding of what is being shared.

Reflect the core emotions

 With empathy restate the thoughts and feelings with reassurance that the child's voice was heard without judgement.

                       Avoid a strong reaction (with tone/volume of voice, facial expressions)

 Refrain from going into fix it mode or dismissing concerns. Keep in mind the child's perspective. Even if it is not what you think happened or what you believe to be true...it IS their perspective.

Name it to Tame it:

This strategy, developed by Dan Siegel, helps children integrate the left (words) and right

(feelings) side of the brain. This will allow them to regulate their strong emotions and calm their nervous system.  Steps:

Name the emotion (say out loud, tell someone, say to self) o Notice where it is felt in the body and describe what it feels like (body sensations) o Younger children may want to choose a color or animal that would represent the emotion o Use a to help calm down

Reassurance/empowerment:

In a time like this, we can listen reflectively and offer reassurance. Here are some key things to let children know:

There are a lot of helpers in our world who are working to protect us and it is not your job to worry.

Our school is a safe place to be. Our custodians, and all of the adults are helping keep our school clean.

You can be a helper too by washing your hands, sneezing into your arm, using tissues to get stuff out of your nose (and then throw it away), and by keeping your fingers out of your mouth, eyes and nose and wearing your face covering.

You can notice when you are feeling worried or nervous and talk to an adult.

The guidelines we are following have been developed by experts in the fields of science and medicine to keep us safe.

Example Conversations

cenario One:

hild: "I am worried about running out of toilet paper, hand sanitizer and food. I heard we won't have any." (affirm contact: physically get at child's level and maintain eye contact).

OTE: If you are unable to address the concern at that time, tell the child you really want to hear what s/he has to say and make a set time to actively listen. It mo.' sound like, "It sounds like you have something very important to ell me, and I want to make sure I can really pay attention to you. Let me get everyone started on their morning ork, and then I can hear what you have to sq. " Then make sure you follow through, even if you think the child as "forgotten about it ".

dult: (paraphrase) "I hear you saying that you are worried about not having things like toilet paper and food." looking in eyes, nodding empathetically) hild, "I heard the stores won't have things we need. adult:    the implicit) "You are nervous about not having food and other things you need like toilet paper. I et a sense that you are thinking a lot about that." hild: "Yes. I heard people talking about it." dult: "You are feeling nervous about running out of things, and not having what you need. Where do you feel the nervousness in your body? If it was a color what would it be? What breathing technique can we do to help our body d mind feel more peaceful?"

 

Scenario 1

• Do breathing together, notice if the emotional state changes, ask the child how s/he feels now and repeat if necessary.

dult: (offer reassurance/empowerment): "There are a lot of helpers in the world who are working on this. The stores and other adults are working on making sure everyone has things they need. Our school will continue to have ood, hand sanitizer and toilet paper for all of the children. What could you do to help make sure our school has enough toilet paper for everyone?" (This may lead to discussion of using what we need and not wasting).

Scenario 2

hild: "There is a bad, bad virus and it is making people die." dult: (with empathetic facial expression and clear eye contact), "It sounds lüce you heard about a virus that is making people sick and you heard people are dying." hild, "They are. I saw it on TV." dult: "It sounds as though this might be making you feel nervous and scared. It sounds like you are worried about letting sick and having someone you love get sick." hild: "Yeah. It makes me feel worried." dult: "You are worried that you and people you care about will get sick (empathetic pause). Where do you feel at in your body? What does it feel like (physical sensations: fluttery, heavy, light)? What breath can we do together to help us feel more calm?" (Do breathing together) dult: "It seems like you are really thinking about others and hoping they are safe and healthy. Should we send heartfelt messages? Think of your family and friends. Put your hands on your heart, "May you be healthy. May you e peaceful. May you feel my love." (can send the same message to self and world too.)

• Ask how the child is now feeling.

dult: "There are a lot of helpers in our world who are working to protect us and it is not your job to worry. Our school is a safe place to be. Our custodians, and all of the adults are helping keep our school clean. You can be a helper too by wearing your face covering, staying 6 feet away from others, washing your hands, sneezing into your

, using tissues to get stuff out of your nose (and then throw it away), and by keeping your fingers out of your mouth, eyes and nose. You can also be a helper to yourself by noticing when you are feeling worried or nervous and talk to an adult like you just did. Please let me know if you have any more worries."

Scenario 3 (HS/MS)

Student: "I am worried about people having the virus and being asymptomatic. Anyone can have it and give it to

dult: (reflect back/paraphrase/point out implicit thoughts with eye contact, calm body language, even tone). "It sounds like you are worried about getting the virus from someone, because you won't         if they are sick if they on't show symptoms. Have you heard about that?" Student: "I heard about it on the news and my mom is worried about it too." dult: (clarify the impact/reflect core emotions) "You are nervous about someone coming into the classroom and spreading the virus. Is that on your mind a lot throughout the school day?" Student: "yes. I just keep looking at people and wondering if they have it and could give it to me." dult: (name it to tame it): "What emotion are you feeling the most when you think about this? Where are you feeling that emotion in your body? What does it feel like? If you could rate your anxiety for 1-10, I being no iety and 10 being very high, what would you rate it?

• Do breathing, or tense and relax exercises. Have the student notice if there is a shift in the strong emotion or stress (How are you feeling now?, What number are you at now?) Keep repeating the relaxation strategy until the student is at a 4 or less).

dult: (Reassurance/empowerment): "There are many people in our world helping with the Covid 19 virus. Doctors and scientists are researching every day and finding ways to help reduce the spread. Scientists are also

 

Developing a vaccine. Our school has protocols from the Department of Health in place to help keep students and staff safe too. You can keep yourself safe by washing your hands, keeping your face covering on, keeping your hands away from your face and staying 6' away from people. You can also let people  how you are feeling an hat you need to stay safe too. If someone does come close to you without a mask on, you can say, "Let's put our ace coverings on and back up a few steps to stay safe and healthy." or "1 am feeling nervous about the virus. I need you to put on your face covering and step back a few feet." (could have the student practice saying it to you.) lease let me know when you are feeling nervous about this. I am here to listen and help."

 

 

Vision - All staff members will have information on how to respond and discuss issues related to social justice and racial inequality with students in a developmentally appropriate way

Rationale: All members of our school community need to feel physically and emotionally safe and supported. It is evident that students will come into the new school year with varying degrees of awareness around the current events relating to social justice and racial inequality. Additionally, these topics and issues will take a toll and impact students in various ways.

Documents with suggested language and consistent terms along with best practices for reflective listening.

From NASP- COVID and Racial Inequality From NASP- Supporting Marginalized Youth From NASP- Social Justice Lesson Plans

Guidance for School Districts on Responding to Recent Events and Racism in America https://socialjusticebooks.org/reviews-by-theme/

Stop any type of harassment or bullying immediately. Given the tone of the current climate, children may feel bullying and intimidation are acceptable. Make it clear that such behavior, in any form (in person, online, on social media), is unacceptable. Promote acceptance and actively teach conflict resolution skills to the perpetrators, bystanders, and victims. Utilize district and building DASA procedures if necessary.

Focus on student strengths, and promote a sense of belonging. All students bring unique skills,strengths, and knowledge into the classroom and school community. Build on those strengths. To promote a sense of belonging in the school, consider having students who are comfortable share their knowledge about their origins, customs, and culture. Reassure all students that they belong and are welcome community members in their schools. Activities that make students feel like they are heard may also be beneficial. A teacher or principal may wish to make a statement announcement such as:

Yesterday (earlier this year), (insert brief factual statement of event) happened. So, what does that mean for us here? It means we continue as a community of respect, love, and welcome for all. As a school/classroom community, it is not a time to divide, hurt, or say mean things. It is a time for us to come together, work together, and respect each and every one of us. Our school/class is a family, and everyone should feel physically and emotionally safe here. We will all make sure that happens. Ift here are students who need extra support with this, I am here to help! (Adapted from Supporting Marginalized Students in Stressful Times: Tips For Educators ")

Self Care Resources

 7 Self Care Strategies for Teachers HERE  40 Acts of Self Care for Teachers HERE

 Happy Teachers Practice Self Care HERE

 Why is it so hard for teachers to take care of themselves? HERE

 Boundaries for Strong Self Care: Creating and Keeping Yourself Happy and Healthy HERE

 Trauma Sensitive Practices & Resilience Building Strategies HERE

 CDC Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19 HERE

 Self-Care During the Coronavirus Pandemic- HERE

 Self-Care Strategies for Educators during Coronavirus Crisis- HERE

 

 

Palmyra-Macedon Central School District

POSTED: August 14, 2020, 3:00 PM

 

Posting of Supplemental Reopening Plan Information Pursuant to the Interim Guidance for In-Person Instruction at Pre-K to Grade 12 Schools during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency

Community Accessibility/Stakeholder Communication and Outreach/Public Meetings 

The NYSED guidelines remind districts that they must always work to create and foster culturally responsive, student-centered learning environments that affirm racial, linguistic and cultural identities . . . and elevate historically marginalized voices.

 

It should be noted that certain means of communication have limitations for marginalized voices and for the Pal-Mac community have unintended negative consequences for families who are homeless or are socio-economically disadvantaged. Requiring certain digital platforms for communication or targeting specific audiences further divides a community creating “haves” and “have nots” with respect to accessibility and voice. As such, the District remains committed to accessibility for all Pal-Mac community members regardless of internet speed, lack of transportation, or lack of access to specific digital communication tools. 

 

In this light, the District has created a specific, low-tech email account for the submission of questions (reopening@palmaccsd.org). Utilizing this format allows all community members to participate in the reopening plan review process by asking questions and also reviewing responses to questions submitted to the email address. The website is used for this process as it ensures accessibility to all community members including those with disabilities or whose primary language is not English.

 

The district must also avoid sending communications that are selective to certain individuals or groups that would disenfranchise another individual or group. As such, the District’s procedures regarding communications that involve all residents are not targeted to specific email addresses or phone numbers. Information is made publicly available using the District’s website that is in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act as well as a range of social media tools that do not require special accounts/privileges for access.  The mechanism identified in the law for school districts to notify residents of such community-wide communications is to notify the official newspapers for subsequent publication. Given the State’s threat to reduce district revenues by 20%, the District has a responsibility to remain fiscally-disciplined and direct resources to the learning needs of students during this time of the State’s health emergency.

 

In addition, NYSED guidance notes that plans are to be adjusted to rapidly address changes that may be needed based on local needs, and to update their plan materials on a regular basis throughout the school year. The website serves as the means to address such changes. Residents should frequently check the school website for updates.

The entire school reopening plan was published on the school district website on July 31, 2020 and was submitted to the DOH and NYSED portals on the same dates.

March 15 - June 19, 2020

Weekly videos

Regular updates from buildings 

Remote learning drop-box

Remote learning support email: techhelp@palmaccsd.org

Daily meal services

Implementation of Continuity of Learning Plan for Emergency Instruction

June 4 - June 12, 2020

Communitywide Thoughtexchange (11,806 “ratings” gathered)

Faculty Thoughtexchange (3181 “ratings” gathered)

Teacher Leadership Thoughtexchange (430 “ratings” gathered)

July 6-8, 2020

Over 60 members of the District’s teacher and building leadership teams came together remotely to build a Student Learning Plan for the upcoming school year to meet the needs for students in a variety of learning settings. These teams included:  Building Principals, RtI Coordinators, Instructional Innovation Specialists, Responsive Classroom Coaches, District and Building Lead teachers.

Teacher Leadership created action plans to meet the social emotional and academic needs of students. 

July 13, 2020    

The NYS Department of Health released guidelines for reopening schools.

July 13, 2020

Initial Preference for Learning Survey (1,600 survey responses plus 200 personal phone calls made by district staff to families who did not respond)

July 16, 2020

The NYS Education Department released guidelines for reopening schools.

July 24, 2020

Meeting with Collective Bargaining Unit Representatives: PMFA

July 28, 2020

Meeting with Collective Bargaining Unit Representatives: CSEA

July 30, 2020

Meeting with Collective Bargaining Unit Representatives: PMAA

July 31, 2020

Deadline to submit plan to State Education Department/Health Department; Plan was submitted by District

August 5, 2020

Conducting Preference for Learning Survey (1,797 preferences)

August 6, 2020

Members of the Trauma, Illness, and Grief team met to develop plans to meet the social emotional needs of students and staff.

August 5, 2020

Question/Answer Email Address created: reopening@palmaccsd.org

August 6, 2020

FAQ document created and updated accordingly

August 10, 2020

Parental preference submissions due

August 11, 2020

Board of Education Meeting

August 11-14, 2020

Transportation Routing

August 11-14, 2020

Development of student schedules and course/class placements for in-person and remote learning

August 13, 2020

In-Person Community Reopening Meeting (Attendance: 57)

August 17, 2020

Virtual Community Meeting in Concert with Wayne County Public Health

August 18, 2020

Virtual Community Meeting (Attendance: 151)

August 19, 2020

Virtual Staff Meeting (District and Building)

Remote Learning

The 2020-21 Remote Learning plan has been developed based on the collected feedback from the June 2020 community and staff Thoughtexchange, in addition to the teacher leadership research on best practices in remote learning over the summer.  As a result of these multiple perspectives, the Remote Learning plan was created on several guiding principles provided in the outline. Approximately 19% of students will be enrolled in remote learning as per parental preference.

 

Guiding Principles of Remote Learning

Address issues of equity by ensuring:

All students will have access to devices and internet access

Families and students have access to guidance and tech support related to the provided devices and learning management systems(LMS)

Instruction is aligned to NYS Learning Standards

Delivery is not a re-creation of an in-person learning environment

Provides for synchronous and asynchronous learning 

Follows District established attendance and grading policies

Maintains clearly defined expectations for students related to digital citizenship and remote learning etiquette

Includes social-emotional learning

Embeds family and student check-ins

 

Elements of the Remote Learning Program

Each student attends school per the approved school calendar on a daily basis.

Each student follows the hours of an in-person school day according to a student's grade level and the assigned daily schedule.

Remote Learning will look different across the grade levels to meet the child’s developmental standards. For example, a kindergarten student’s remote learning experience will be different than that of a middle school student. 

Each student must complete a digital citizenship course related to expectations and the code of conduct for remote learning.

Daily attendance and active engagement are required.

Student participation and completion of all class and/or coursework are expected.

The District's attendance and grading policies will mirror that of in-person coursework.

There will be regular, substantive interactions between teachers and students that provide routine scheduled times for students to seek feedback and support from teachers:

Asynchronous (not live/in-person) assignments and assessments will be completed and submitted according to the regular school day schedule.

Students will be expected to be prepared and participate in live (synchronous) virtual lessons as outlined in their provided class schedule and as outlined in the digital citizenship course. To protect individual privacy, live virtual lessons may not be recorded.

 

Internet and Device Access

In March 2020, the District assessed students’ levels of access to devices and high-speed internet and addressed accordingly. The District provides a device to every enrolled student. To ensure equity, the District will provide devices appropriate for online learning. K-2 will get an iPad and students in grades 3-12 will get Chromebooks. The District will work with families that do not have internet access to obtain methods to connect.

 

Parent/Caregiver Support

Substantial parental support and presence are necessary to:

assist children with varied activities and coursework.

monitor the daily student schedule.

ensure student attendance (i.e., prompt presence, logging in, participation, management), and report absences.

engage each student in self-guided asynchronous learning. 

coordinate with related service providers as appropriate.

provide and/or assist with home-school communication.

 

Learning Management Systems

Remote learners at the Primary School will use Seesaw and Google Meet as platforms to deliver learning opportunities and document growth.

Remote learners in grades 3-12 will use Schoology, Schoology Conferences and Google Meet as platforms to deliver learning opportunities and document growth.

 

Student Absence from Remote Learning Due to Illness

When a child is absent from school for illness or any other reason, parents or 

guardians must notify the School Health Office. A written note of explanation must also 

be submitted. Parents/students are to consult directly with the instructor regarding 

missed work for short-term absences.



 

Food Service for Remote Learners

The district will continue to make meals available in compliance with the Child Nutrition Program requirements and by request of students engaged in remote learning. Lunch and breakfast (for days on which school would normally have been in session) will be available. Parents may request food service for remote learners by completing the form available on the Food Services page at www.palmaccsd.org. 

 

In an effort to minimize personal contact, and increase social distancing, it is anticipated the district will serve multiple meals at a time.  During full 5-day school weeks, service will be provided as follows:

 

Mondays: 2 lunches and 2 breakfasts per student

Tuesdays: No meal service

Wednesdays: 3 lunches and 3 breakfasts per student

Thursdays: No meal service

Fridays: No meal service

 

Meal service schedules for shortened school weeks will be available on the Food Services webpage at www.palmaccsd.org. 

 

Meal pickup will occur outside of the Pal-Mac High School main entrance (151 Hyde Parkway, Palmyra) after the regular school day.  Parents will pull up along the curb near the main entrance flagpoles and remain in their vehicle. A staff person will bring the meals to the vehicle.

 

Any family who needs help with the request form or is unable to pick up meals at the High School, should call 315-597-3407 for assistance.


 

Testing Protocol and Procedures Developed by the School District’s Medical Director

 

Executive Summary

Despite mitigation efforts such as daily health surveys and the district's best efforts to minimize transmission with cohorts (PK-8), face coverings, and physical distancing, among others, infections can still happen in a school setting. When surveillance has failed and infection occurs in the school setting during the school day, the school district has four basic responsibilities to get a person referred for testing:

1.    Recognition and assessment;

2.    Isolation and containment;

3.    Family and Department of Health (DOH) notification, and

4.    Referral to the private physician or other health care provider for testing.

 

The district does not do testing.

Wayne County Public Health is collaborating with Finger Lakes Community Health for COVID-19 testing.

Infection spread might be limited to a classroom or might occur between class cohorts. The school nurse will use a fever and symptom algorithm developed by our district’s medical director to recognize and assess anyone with symptoms suggestive of COVID-19. When a school nurse suspects COVID-19, the nurse will immediately isolate and contain that individual from others. The nurse will then notify the emergency contact that dismissal is necessary and keep the individual safe and comfortable until dismissal. (Should the nurse later learn from the individual or parent that they tested positive, the nurse will also notify the Department of Health.)

 

The nurse will recommend to the individual or parent/guardian referral by phone or in-person that same day to the private physician or other health care provider for evaluation and COVID-19 testing. The nurse will give the individual written information from the CDC on what to do when ill with COVID-19.

 

The school nurse and District’s Medical Director will both work with the local public health department and the private physician or other health care provider as needed. However, the private physician or other health care provider and the local public health department will determine who will be tested and will conduct the testing. The district cannot require testing.

 

All positive laboratory confirmed or physician diagnosed probable cases are managed on a case-by-case basis for a return out of isolation and back to school. Health certificates from the private physician or other health care provider and the public health department's direct guidance will be required. Lacking testing, individuals must follow CDC and NYS DOH symptom-based criteria for a return to school.

 

Referral for Testing

The school nurse will advise all individuals or parents/persons in parental relations that anyone dismissed for presumed or suspected COVID-19 must be in contact that same day by phone or in-person with their private physician or other health care provider. They will be advised to describe the symptoms that were consistent with COVID-19. The school nurse will advise that the district recommends COVID-19 testing per the NYS DOH guidelines for persons who have symptoms of COVID-19. They will be advised that they cannot return to school without symptom-based criteria clearance from their physician or other health care provider and COVID-19 test results. The school nurse will suggest that they not post on social media any references to their medical condition including COVID-19. The nurse will provide written guidelines from the CDC on what to do if ill with COVID-19.

 

If test results are positive for COVID-19, the individual/parent will be advised that the District is required to provide names of contacts with the health department for contact tracing. The individual will also be required to provide such a list to the Department of Health. 

 

A letter notifying the school community that a positive case, not identifying any individual, grade-level or classroom by name, has been confirmed.

 

Contact Tracing Protocol and Procedures Developed by the School District’s Medical Director

 

Executive Summary

Contact tracing is a complex investigational tool that involves identifying people who have an infectious disease (index cases) and people with whom they came in contact (contacts). The district does not do contact tracing. The district works closely and cooperatively with the epidemiologists at the Department of Health who do contact tracing.

 

Once identified, trained staff work with contacts to interrupt disease spread by calling every single person with whom they were in contact over the infectious period. Contact tracing includes asking people with COVID-19 to isolate themselves for at least 10 days and until they are 72 hours without fever off fever-reducing medications, and until their symptoms are improving, so other people do not catch the disease from them. Contact tracers also ask that asymptomatic close contacts to quarantine themselves at home voluntarily for 14 days.

 

Public health law mandates the district to keep track of and to report to the DOH the names of contacts within the school of a first (index) case for any reportable infection. This is not a new procedure and has been done by the School District in the past for common childhood illnesses like mumps, whooping cough, and unusual highly contagious diseases like meningococcal meningitis. Now we will do so for COVID-19. That is the law and will be followed by the District. The DOH will be in direct contact with individuals through contact tracing if a case of COVID-19 is found within a school building, and if there is a risk you or a child could have been exposed. Otherwise, the district will send a general letter to staff and students in the building notifying people that a case of COVID-19 was confirmed. Confidentiality will be maintained. However, you will know that if you were not contacted by the DOH, you were not a direct contact of the positive index case. 

 

A diagram of contact tracing

 

Person A        ⇨    Person B            ⇨    Person C

Confirmed Case                     Contact of Case A                            Contact of a Contact (B)

Required to be in        Required to be in mandatory        Unless Person B tests                  isolation            (direct contact) or precautionary    positive for COVID19                (proximate contact) quarantine has or develops                     symptoms of COVID-19, Person C is quarantined                                                                   

Definitions:

Close contact is defined as contact for more than 10 minutes at a distance closer than six-feet from 48 hours before the person became ill until the person was isolated of an infected person with laboratory confirmed or probable COVID-19.

 

Probable COVID-19 is defined as a person who meets clinical and epidemiological evidence of covid-19, but who does not have laboratory confirmation. (For asymptomatic persons, the time frame is two days prior to specimen collection until the time the patient is isolated.)

 

Proximate Contact is defined as being in the same enclosed environment such as a classroom, office, or gatherings but greater than 6 ft. from a person displaying symptoms of covid-19 or someone who has tested positive for covid-19.

 

NOTE:

It is important to note that brief interactions between individuals are less likely to result in transmission; however, symptoms and the type of interaction remain important. The longer the exposure, the more the exposure risk. (e.g., Did the person cough directly into the face of the individual or did the two individuals briefly pass one another in a hallway? The first example is a higher risk than the second.)

 

In general, contact tracing involves identifying people who have an infectious disease (cases) and people who they came in contact with (contacts). Once identified, trained staff work with them to interrupt disease spread. Contact tracing includes asking people with COVID-19 to isolate themselves so other people do not catch the disease from them. It also asks their close contacts to quarantine themselves at home voluntarily.

 

Contact tracing for covid-19 typically involves:

Interviewing people with positive COVID-19 test results to identify everyone they had close contact with during the time they may have been infectious. The infectious period is defined as 48 hours before the onset of symptoms and 10 days after the onset of symptoms.

Notifying contacts of their potential exposure.

Referring contacts for testing.

Monitoring contacts for signs and symptoms of COVID-19 for 14 days.

 

Because our society is in the middle of a pandemic, the District must release the names and contact information of all close and proximate contacts of positive or probable COVID-19. The school nurse will provide the DOH with the name and contact information. The DOH will conduct appropriate contact tracing of every individual identified as a close or proximate contact. The school nurse will work and cooperate closely with the epidemiologist at the DOH to ensure that a list of school contacts, if identified as a risk by the DOH within and outside of the cohort, is provided to the best of our ability.

 

It is helpful to remember that the contact of a positive case will be asked to self-quarantine for 14 days in the event symptoms develop. A contact, person c, of a contact, person b, however, is generally not considered at risk and is not asked to quarantine unless the first contact, person b, turned positive. If person b turned positive, then person c would be the contact of a positive case and would need to quarantine for 14 days.

 

Person A        ⇨    Person B            ⇨    Person C

Confirmed Case                     Contact of Case A                            Contact of a Contact (B)

Required to be in        Required to be in mandatory        Unless Person B tests                  isolation            (direct contact) or precautionary     positive for COVID19                                                                                  (proximate contact) quarantine    has or develops                       symptoms of COVID-19,                                                                                                                  Person C is quarantined                                   


 

Positive Test Results

Anyone identified by the public health department or their physician, if the individual so chooses that route of care, as eligible for testing may choose to be tested. If tested positive and showing symptoms, that individual must follow CDC standard criteria for when isolation can end. In this case, the DOH will use a test-based criteria return to school which includes the following:

 

1.    MD/DO/NP/PA Health Certificate with two negative acute COVID-19 

molecular test results, both taken since symptoms first appeared done at least 24 hrs. apart and;

2.    an attestation by the treating MD/DO/NP/PA that the individual meets 

symptom-based return to school criteria.

 

Additionally, a district notification letter will be sent to staff and families when any infectious disease has been identified in a classroom. The letter will be sent alerting everyone that a case of COVID-19 has been confirmed in our school and that everyone should be mindful to watch for symptoms of the disease for the next 14 days. The letter is confidential, and no identification will be provided.

Symptomatic or Asymptomatic with Negative Test Results

If test results for COVID-19 are negative, with or without symptoms, a health certificate from the treating MD/DO/NP/PA with HIPAA/FERPA release that acute illness is unrelated to COVID-19, affirming the individual meets symptom-based-criteria must be provided before the individual can return to school. 

 

Symptom-based criteria currently in place by the NYSDOH include:

 

1.    At least 72 hours without fever off fever-reducing medications, and

 

2.    At least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared, or since test 

date, and

 

3.    Other symptoms have improved.

It is noteworthy that some persons with severe illness may produce competent virus for more than 10 days, and may need isolation up to twenty (20) days after symptom onset. In cases of severe illness, the School District’s Medical Director may consider asking for a release from an infectious disease expert as recommended by the CDC before allowing an individual back in school.

 

Symptomatic Individuals Who Do Not Provide a Health Certificate

The district anticipates that despite the DOH recommendation that any individual who presents with symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 contact their private physician or other health care provider, there are some who simply will not. In that case, the District will use the symptom-based criteria without a medical certificate for return, but with the minimum of 10 days before an individual is allowed back, and the standard of 72 hours fever-free with an improvement of symptoms.

 

Symptomatic Individuals with a Health Certificate Documenting an Acute Illness but without COVID-19 Test Results

The district also anticipates that there may be symptomatic individuals who see a physician or other health care provider but who do not have testing because the diagnosis is thought not to be COVID-19 by the examiner. The NYSDOH has stipulated that no one who had symptoms consistent with COVID-19 may be allowed back without COVID-19 testing based on a physician’s or other health care provider’s health certificate alone for an acute illness. This is because other comorbid conditions are known to exist with COVID-19 and can hide the presence of COVID-19, like strep throat. Therefore, if there is no testing for COVID-19 and an individual was dismissed from school by the nurse with suspicion of COVID-19, a symptom-based criteria will be used with a minimum of 10-days before an individual is allowed back, and the standard of 72 hours fever free with an improvement of symptoms.


 

Symptomatic Individuals with a Health Certificate Documenting a Chronic Illness with an Acute Exacerbation but without COVID-19 Test Results

There are some chronic medical conditions that may have symptoms similar to COVID-19 that a treating physician or other health care provider may be aware of that is not in the school medical record. Therefore, anyone with a chronic medical condition, such as asthma or cystic fibrosis, among others that are well known to a treating physician or other treating health care provider, may be documented as such by that examiner, and that individual may be cleared to return to school. The district recommends that conditions whose symptoms may mimic COVID-19 should be put into a formal individual healthcare plan to avoid confusion and needless loss time from instruction in the future. A note from the treating physician or other health care provider with an emergency action plan will facilitate this process for students.

 

From the Desk of the School Physician

 

From the Desk of the School Physician

Our school has a confirmed case (positive) of COVID-19. Now what?

Don't panic!

About I out of 100 New Yorkers currently are infected with COVID-19. When school opens, and people come closer together, we expect we might see cases of COVID-19 in our school. Cases can happen even if we wear masks, keep a distance from each other, wash our hands, and do everything we are supposed to do right. The reason is that these behaviors reduce the risk of disease spread, but they do not guarantee we will not get the virus. So we should not be surprised or scared if it happens. Most people, about 8 out of 10, have a flu-like illness when they have COVID-19 and fully recover. But we should understand what might happen if someone in our school gets sick with COVID-19 because their illness can affect us.

When someone gets sick with possible COVID-19, this person is sent to the health office. Yup, the school nurse thinks this might be COVID-19 and puts the person into a containment room so they can rest comfortably until someone comes to pick them up. The sick person has to wear a face covering and must stay away from others, at least six feet. When the person is picked up, the school nurse will suggest that the parent call their private physician or other health care provider that day to discuss whether to go directly for a COVID-19 test. After testing, if done, the person will be asked to isolate at home for at least 10 days, until they are without fever for 72 hours, off all fever reducing medicine, and are feeling better, able to learn, and symptoms are improving. The person who was ill will need to bring in a letter or health certificate from their physician and COVID-19 test results. If the test was positive, the person who was ill needs a release from isolation by the local public health department.

While the sick person is home getting better, back at school close contacts within 6 ft for more than 10 minutes will have gotten a call from the public health department that they were exposed to a person positive for COVID-19. They will be asked to self-quarantine at home for 14 days from the date of their exposure, advised to check their temperature twice a day, and to watch for symptoms. Proximate contacts more than 6 feet for longer times may also be asked to do the same, if the public health department decides there is a significant risk for them, too. The school will send out a general letter (no names) to the entire building reminding them to do the daily health screening because of the positive case in the building.

Any area of the building that required quarantine is closed and disinfected before anyone can reenter. Depending on the number of contacts, a few people, an entire class, a wing or corridor, or even the entire building may need to quarantine at home for 1 to 14 days following an exposure. Isolation and quarantine should not alarm anyone. These are precautionary measures to safeguard us all when a positive case of COVID-19 is discovered. The public health department is the final authority.